SHOWCASING THE BEST OF RECENT MEXICAN CINEMA,

THE 2011 EDITION OF THE HOLA MEXICO FILM FESTIVAL

ARRIVES IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA WITH THE THEME:

MEXICO, A PLACE LIKE THE MOVIES!

 

The Opening Night Screening of the festival features the now legendary red carpet with Hollywood and Mexican film stars, and the USA Premiere of ACORAZADO, a film directed by Álvaro Curiél

 

The 2011 Hola Mexico Film Festival takes place at the Ricardo Montalban Theatre in Hollywood, California on May 19th-25th

Los Angeles, California (April 20, 2011) – The 2011 Hola Mexico Film Festival (HMFF) arrives for the third consecutive year to Los Angeles, California, bringing a sample of the exciting Mexican film industry of recent years and showcasing its rich diversity. HMFF offers a selection of 9 narrative and 3 documentary feature films by Mexican film production companies and directors, including 3 USA premieres and 5 Los Angeles Premieres. The 2011 Hola Mexico Film Festival takes place at the Ricardo Montalban Theatre in Hollywood, California on May 19th-25th. See www.holamexicoff.com for more information.

 Mexico has always been a country of contrasts, a land where the incredible happens every day.  Some of the most gorgeous places in the world are in Mexico, but the county also has many unresolved problems. Nowadays, Mexico is a place like the movies! The Hola Mexico Film Festival showcases reality as seen through the eyes of the talented Mexican film directors. Mexico, a place like the movies! (¡México está de película!) is the theme of the 2011 edition of HMFF and celebrates the contrasting multiple faces and the reality of Mexico, from the landscapes and history to the human experience in terms of class, economic status, sexual diversity, age and dreams. The reality of Mexico indeed, can be explained by its recent films.

 The Hola Mexico Film Festival in Los Angeles starts on Thursday, May 19th with the USA premiere screening of Acorazado, directed by Álvaro Curiél; with acting performances by Silverio Palacios and Laura de la Luz. Filmed in Cuba and Mexico, the film tells the odyssey of unemployed Silverio Palacios who leaves Mexico in search of the American Dream. Convinced that it’s nearly impossible to cross the border like everyone else, he impersonates a Cuban refugee and sails to Miami on a handmade raft! To his surprise, instead of reaching Miami, he arrives in Cuba but the island is not ready for the witty and crafty Mexican. Winner of the Morelia Film Festival Audience Award, the film masterfully generates both laughter and reflection. The opening night of HMFF also features a red carpet that has become legendary for its A-list celebrities participating. It is the night where stars of Mexican Cinema including those living and working in Hollywood,  Hollywood actors and starts in Latin music come together to celebrate the best works in Mexican Cinema.

 Among the highlights of HMFF, Carlos Carrera’s new film DE LA INFANCIA (FROM CHILDHOOD) and EL INFIERNO (HELL) by Luis Estrada, starting: Damian Alcazar and Joaquin Cosio; make their USA Premiere. The festival will also have directors and actors from selected films as special guests to present their work and offer Q&A sessions after the screenings.

 HMFF Director and Founder, Samuel Douek said: “I envisioned a much more ambitious program for 2011, beyond just screening great quality films, the festival will join forces with various non-profit organizations and each will receive a significant amount of tickets to fundraise for their specific causes.” He continued: “The Hola Mexico Film Festival will showcase a celebration of Mexican Cinema while making a positive difference in the lives of Mexicans and Latinos in Southern California.”

 The nonprofit organizations confirmed to participate to date are: Peace over Violence – with a new project that helps undocumented and immigrant Latinas emerge from domestic abuse, Homeboy Industries – Works to reincorporate youth into society with job training and job opportunities, Mujeres de la tierra – A women’s group that seeks to protect the environment and increase green spaces in south central LA, The Wall Las Memorias Project – is dedicated to promoting wellness and preventing illness among Latino populations affected by HIV/AIDS by using the inspiration of The AIDS Monument as a catalyst for social change, Frijoliwood – provides opportunities for Latin filmmakers in the US entertainment industry, Anahuak Youth Sports Association – It provides sports programs and activities to children in low income households, William C. Velasquez Institute – The Institute seeks to increase the politic and economic participation of Latinos in the USA, The Los Angeles Youth Network – Empowers abused, neglected and homeless adolescents to become self-sufficient, UCLA Latino/a Caucus – It hosts the Social Services in the Latino/a Community Conference, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts It presents classic Spanish language drama and contemporary plays on Hispanic themes to English and Spanish speaking audiences, Bienestar – the agency offers health and well-being programs for the Latino community and other underserved communities and, Nosotros – It serves as an incubator to help Latinos who are pursuing a career in the Entertainment Industry.

 Another noticeable change this year that gives the moviegoers a better festival experience is the new venue: the Ricardo Montalban Theatre will become the Temple of Mexican Cinema; going beyond the movies and into the land of Tequila, Beer, and Mexican food. The theater is located at 1615 Vine Street, Los Angeles, CA 90028. The HMFF in Loa Angeles runs from May 19th to 25th of 2011. Tickets are $9.00 for all screenings and can be purchased online at www.holamexicoff.com and at the theater box office. Deeply discounted tickets will also be made available at FAMSA stores across Los Angeles.  

The 2011 Hola Mexico Film Festival is sponsored by LA WEEKLY, Pantelion Films, Tequila Milagro, La Opinion, Exitos 93.9, The Walt Disney Company, Dish Latino, CINE LATINO, Mexico Tourism Board, and SECRETARÍA DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES DE MÉXICO